Below you'll find a few common questions asked of Rare Coins of New Hampshire.  If you're questions are not answered on this page, please feel free to click the Contact Us tab and fill out the contact form at the bottom of the page and we'll gladly get back to you with the best possible answer.

FAQs

Spider FAQ
  • Mailing and/or Returning Items
  • 1. How do I mail or return items to Rare Coins of New Hampshire?

    Instructions for Shipping

    Precious Metals & Numismatics Through

    USPS INSURED/REGISTERED Mail Service

    Please follow these instructions when shipping precious metals or numismatics to us:

    PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE TO NOTIFY US BEFORE MAILING ANYTHING TO RCNH.

    1.)  Ship precious metals and numismatics via U.S. Postal Service:

    USPS Insured - for values under $1,000.00.

    USPS Registered - for values $1,000.00 and up to $25,000.

    2.)  ONLY SHIP ITEMS TO US IN A BOX!  DO NOT SHIP IN AN ENVELOPE!

    3.) Be sure to include a packing list with: your name, address, phone number and an itemized list of every item in the box.  Please keep a copy of this list for your own records.  Include values, if known.

    4.)  You can use newspaper, bubblepack, or similar packing materials in the box to protect your items.

    5.)  Registered packages require that all of the seams on the box be covered in brown paper tape.  If mailing in a Priority Flat Rate Box, please DO NOT cover the words “Flat Rate” on the box with brown paper tape.

    6.)  Ship packages to:

    R.C.N.H., Inc.

    P.O. Box 720

    Milford, NH 03055

    7.)  Please call your representative when your package has been shipped.  We in turn will call you when your package has arrived.

    Broken Coin Holder

    This was sent in an envelope and even though this was insured, the Post Office won't cover the damages because it wasn't properly packaged.  This is why items should be sent to RCNH in a box.

     Call us at: 1-800-225-7264

  • Bullion Questions
  • 1. I can't find bullion for sale on your website, how do I order?

    Although Rare Coins of New Hampshire does not maintain in-house inventory of bullion products, we are able to acquire them for our clients as need dictates and at very competitive prices. Due to the volatile nature of these markets, we require good funds on hand in the form of cleared check, certified funds, or via wire transfer before we are able to “lock in” a price for you at any given time. Credit cards are not accepted for bullion transactions. Once we have good funds in our possession we are able to purchase for you at your discretion, not ours.

    We ask a very small service charge over our wholesale cost, usually in the amount of 1% for gold and 2% for silver transactions. The only other fee involved is that of the postage cost involved in sending your package to you and varies depending on the weight and value. This charge ranges from $5-25 for most orders, particularly heavy or valuable deliveries may be more. We ship through the U.S. Postal Service and all packages are discreetly marked for purposes of confidentiality and fully insured for safety.

    If you would like to discuss bullion ownership in more detail or to request information on ordering please call us at 800-225-7264 and speak with one of our numismatists who will be glad to answer any questions you may have.

  • 2. Do you offer bullion services?

    Absolutely! Many of our clients utilize gold and silver bullion as a necessary component to their diversified hard asset portfolio. Whether as a hedge against a soft economy, to profit from underlying moves in the price of the metal itself, or just because the coins are beautiful, the reasons for ownership are many.

     

    Our core business focuses on numismatic coins, meaning those whose price is determined by their rarity, condition, and collector demand. A 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter, the key date of the series contains approximately seventy five cents worth of silver yet is usually worth anywhere from $1000 to well over $20,000 depending on its condition. A rare date $20 Saint Gaudens contains just under one ounce of gold and can also be worth many thousands of dollars. Changes in precious metal values have a relatively negligible effect of the prices of such items.

     

    Bullion on the other hand refers to gold, silver and platinum coins or bars whose value is directly tied to the price of the underlying metal they are composed of. If gold fluctuates by $5 on any given day for instance, one ounce gold bullion products will move accordingly. These items are not rare, nor particularly collectable and thus maintain very little premium over their intrinsic value.

     

    The most commonly traded forms of gold bullion are American Gold Eagles which come in coin form and are available in weights of one, half, quarter and tenth ounce denominations. These are 92% pure or 22 carat gold. Usually the smaller the denomination, the higher the premium and thus the less gold you will be getting for your dollar. Smaller denominations however can come in handy for those who may be in need of small change or even as great gift items.

     

    The Canadian Mint produces Maple Leaves which come in the same denominations as the Gold Eagles described above with the primary difference being that they are 99.99% or 24 carat pure gold.

     

    In addition, numerous manufacturers produce gold bullion in bar form, usually in weights of one and ten ounces. It is important to own bars made by widely recognized refiners such as Credit Suisse, Johnson-Matthey or Englehard and that they be a minimum of 99.9% purity.

     

    All of these items are comparably priced with each other in relation to the price of gold, and recently have been hovering at close to $15 over spot. Neither really has an advantage over the other in terms of investment potential, ownership is really just a matter of preference.

     

    The most commonly traded form of silver bullion are American Silver Eagles which are about the size of a silver dollar and contain one ounce of 99.9% pure silver. These are very popular as a form of silver ownership and also make great gift items. There are certain refining and manufacturing costs involved in the production of Silver Eagles which is passed along to the end user, usually resulting in their price running about $1.75 over the spot price of silver.

     

    Various manufacturers also produce silver bullion in bar form, usually in weights of one, ten and one hundred ounces. It is important to own bars made by widely recognized refiners such as Johnson-Matthey or Englehard and that they be a minimum of 99.9% purity. These bars often trade at prices much closer to spot than the Silver Eagles, often just a few cents over as they are treated more as a bulk item and have smaller production costs involved.

     

    Please note, certain marketers send these items to third party certification services whereupon they are encapsulated in a tamper proof holder and assigned a technical grade. These sellers may then offer them at inflated prices while extolling the virtues of these rarities which are now officially bestowed with super high grade designations such as Mint State or Proof-69. Understand that these are not rare, as a matter of fact the vast majority exist in this approximate condition due to strict production standards. It is our opinion that this is a poor form of bullion ownership and that you will be better served by ignoring these products. Except in very rare cases, certifying bullion does not increase the value and any premium paid at the time of purchase will usually be completely lost when it comes time to sell.

     

  • 3. Where can I find the most recent spot prices for gold, silver and platinum?

News

November 2017 Baltimore Show Report

By Warren Mills

It’s always a quick one hour flight to Baltimore which makes it a pleasure to get too!  A major show so close is always wonderful to attend.  I arrived a day early to see dealers that were showing their wares in hotel suites.  It gives me an opportunity to see coins early on that I may miss if I wait for the start of the show and also allows me to get coins that are saved for me by dealers that appreciate our focus for original strictly graded coins.  You have to pay for the privilege but it is well worth it in the long run.  We never want to compromise our standards and this pays off when our clients go to sell their material.  Pre-show, we spent about six figures, I'd call that a good start.

Thursday, November 9th, was the first day of the show.  The weather was very cool and the show seemed a bit slow. I asked anyone that handled nice coins to show me anything of top quality.  We were lucky to find a bunch of nice want list coins for our clients so our new purchase inventory may be a little sparse.

An interesting observation is that for most series of coins, CAC bids are much stronger than non-CAC bids.  The prices for silver dollars are especially shocking.  As an example, 1892-O Morgan dollars have a grey sheet bid of $3000 but a CAC bid of $6000!  This reflects the commercialized grading of this series and the many over graded coins on the market.  Many silver dollars have similar differences in the bid levels.  An interesting note also is that a well struck true 1892-O in gem condition will sell for more than the $6000 CAC bid wholesale!  If CAC holds the line on their standards, CAC should continue to lead the market.  Gold coins that are scarcer also reflect a significant price differential.  The underlying message here is that over grading or commercial grading is destroying the price structure of many series of coins.  Look at the pricing of the silver commemorative series.  Stripping and dipping became the rage and nice MS-63 coins started to get graded as MS-65.  Over population ensues and bidders stop supporting the market, prices drop and then the series goes into free fall.  Franklin halves and Walkers have also been destroyed due to over grading.  Bulk submission gold and dollars have led to competition for grading fees and the services sometimes give the benefit of the doubt for a full point.  Grading needs to tighten up or the market may never recover.  Nice original commemoratives that are attractive still are desirable and real pretty toned coins are incredibly strong but buyers know to throw away the grey sheet when they find the truly superior coin.  The overhang of marginally graded coins drags down everything.

CAC is also not immune to coins that have no business being stickered.  For the most part I love the concept but every coin needs to be inspected with a jaundiced eye.  I saw some CAC coins that I thought did not deserve a sticker.  However, I’d rather have a poorly graded stickered coin than a non CAC coin if I’m a little unsure of my grading.  The other advantage that CAC has over the other services is that if you bring a coin to their attention that does not deserve a sticker they will buy the coin and take the sticker off.  Bottom line, they put their money where their mouth is.

I did spend a few hours reviewing coins for customers to help them with their grading.  I’m always happy to give opinions and pick out any coins that should be sent to CAC, held onto as they are or sold for a better example if it becomes available.  This critiquing is necessary for people to learn about the nuances of grading.

I also noticed that the people walking the floor are less educated about buying coins than they were 10 years ago.  Baltimore was a mecca for older educated collectors that flocked to the show years ago.   As that population aged, the knowledge was not handed down.  That’s why I try to spend as much time with people as I can to impart any tidbits that my help them.

One dealer I greatly respect had cases of affordable coins that he lets collectors pick through with no pressure at all.  When he was at the Long Beach coin show last month, he sold over $10,000 worth of these coins to knowledgeable buyers.  His sales in Baltimore were $143 of the same types of coins.  I asked him for his observation as to why there was such a divergence and he said the customers he spoke to in Baltimore have a fraction of the knowledge than the customers in California have.  I was shocked and I have no explanation for this.

This show surprised me in the sense that it was easier to sell a six figure coin than a low four figure coin.  Does this mean that big money which is normally smart money is picking off the classic rarities while prices are down?  At some point, there should be a filtering down for attractive lower priced pieces.  I don’t remember this phenomenon happening for a prolonged time period in the market before but it is happening now.

There is also one major buyer in the market place that has spent so much money in the past year that he is making some dealers careers.  One dealer I spoke with told me a couple of years ago that he had no retirement plan and didn’t know if he would have to work until his dying day.  Now he is making so much money he doesn’t know what to do with it.  I’m happy for him but again, smart money usually jumps in ahead of the market.  Let’s hope this is the beginning of something good for all of us.

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